Health From The Inside Out

Are you a client looking for treatment that honors your whole body? Offers options to treat injury, disease, pain, obesity in addition to things like depression, anxiety, trauma to name a few? Then Check out My “Out of the Office” Blog to find education on mental health, physical health, workouts you can do anywhere, easy quick meals that support increased mental health, and more. This is the place clients can go between sessions to stay focused on their treatment goals.

Are you a therapist interested in a more holistic treatment? Want to better understand the “art” of therapy? Or gain insight into treating physical issues clients present with? Want to know more about how the body is impacted by mental health? Understand the role of the nervous system and polyvagal responses in treatment? Deepen understanding of common mental health presentations within the structure of the body? – The Somatic Psychologist Blog is For You. Read More Below.

Exercise and Mental Health

There is much research that shows the links between exercise and enhanced mental health. Exercise has been found to help decrease symptoms of depression, anxiety, bi-polar, schizophrenia, and trauma. In addition, performing exercise helps us create a more positive thought structure about ourselves, our abilities, and our strength to care for ourselves. This translates into a concept called Mastery.

Mastery is important because it helps us build a healthy self-esteem – or how we see ourselves in the world and as worthy of love and belonging. Love and belonging matter because as humans we are hard wired to need other humans. We build our brains off each other, our somatic system picks up on the connection we have with other humans (and animals) and we regulate each other – for better or worse.

By participating in regular exercise you are building the systems of the body, mind, and spirit that enhance the human existence, thus creating a more positive disposition and coping in everyday life. (Just so you know … you still have free choice, choosing to participate in activities or with groups that hurt you in some way. Will not make your life better just because you are moving. Make sure you choose wisely when choosing who you surround yourself with and how you balance your workouts to meet your individual needs).

If you are someone who struggles with mental illness and would like your personal trainer to know how to best help you OR you are a personal trainer who wants to better serve clients with mental health struggles. Please use the contact me page to send me an email, I’m putting together an article series to help make sure mental health doesn’t get left at the physical health door.

Your Emotions are Just Information … Use them wisely

Have you ever thought about your emotions as chemical reactions in your body? For many they feel emotions come out of nowhere or are stupid and confusing, but in reality emotions are a source of intelligence and create chemical trails within your body. As a result, emotions shift your physical system and impact physical health structures. 

As a source of intelligence emotions give us information. They are a quicker and often more true source of information than our thinking mind. Those who are both emotionally intelligent and intellectually intelligent come out as the winners in our society. They can discern and utilize information along side reading social cues. This allows them to engage people in their goals and methods as well as make on the spot corrections to their language, presentation focus, and examples. Many studies show that those who invoke emotion during a presentation are viewed more favorably by the audience. Thus their information and call to action may be better remembered and given more importance than those who only present data and reason. 

Every emotion you have creates a chemical – electrical pattern within the body. This chemical electrical pattern is read by your endocrine system. The endocrine system then determines what hormones to move into the system and at what level to keep homeostasis going. Your body is always working to balance you. In contrast, hormones determine what you focus on. Let’s use sex hormones as our examples to help outline how our chemical nature determines our ability to engage with our environment. Before, I get feed back that this is too stereotypical, please remember that we all have differing levels of both testosterone, estrogen and progesterone – male or female, and that having a balanced endocrine system can help decrease many of the mental health issues we experience. For example, Olsson, Kopsida, Sorjonen, and Savic report:

“In sum, our results showed that females treated with testosterone, compared with the placebo, displayed an enhanced tendency to rate low-dominant faces as dominant, and this hampered the ability to accurately attribute mental states to others. In contrast, estrogen administered to males did not affect social–cognitive performance but affected vicarious emotional reactivity”. (p. 520, 2016)

The presence of more or less testosterone has been shown to help us focus on particular emotional states and ignore others. Emotions considered to be low on status help (disgust and sadness) can be more difficult for those with higher testosterone levels to discern, especially at lower levels of intensity (Rukavina et. al, 2018). This may be helpful for those who have high levels of fear and anxiety, as testosterone supplementation can help reduce the responsiveness to these emotional states. However, one must be careful as too much can lead to higher levels of aggression and stress on the cardiovascular system. Remember the “Type A” syndrome of men who have coronary problems midlife? The reactivity in their endocrine system around anger and aggression created stress on their cardic systems. 

In addition, Toffoletto et al. state, 

“Ovarian hormones are pivotal for the physiological maintenance of the brain function as well as its response to environmental stimuli. There is mounting evidence attesting the relevance of endogenous ovarian hormones as well as exogenous estradiol and progesterone for emotional and cognitive processing” (p. 28, 2014). 

In a meta-analysis of over 30 studies looking at fluctuations in female hormones, brain activation, and emotional and cognitive processing they showed how differing levels of endogenous hormones impacted focal points and reactions to social and cognitive stimuli. 

We like to think … we just think, but in reality everything we are is a chemical – electrical pattern inter-woven into our core being. It is both a physical and a cognitive process. Last week we looked closely at our thoughtsand saw that what we think influences how we feel (physically and mentally). This week we flip to recognize that how we feel influences how we think. And how we feel is moderated by what is going on around us and inside of us. It is so important to care for your body. By looking at our differing sex hormones we see that we may over or under react to external factors based on levels of hormones in our physical system. We didn’t decide to focus more on one or the other, it is what our body mandated. As a result, we can shift how our bodies are operating by caring well for ourselves on a physical and mental level. 

We need to pay attention to things like good foods – we need the nutrientsto make the neurotransmitters and hormones we need to calm our nervous systems and help our brain activate areas needed for particular focus. 

We need daily movementas it helps us metabolize stress hormones effectively and helps us make the feel good states our endorphins and endocannaboids can provide. We are calm and alert, but not overly focused or hyper vigilant – neither are helpful for intelligence states, learning, relationship, or creativity. 

We need positive sleep and enough of it. Sleep helps our system reset and restore. Without it we are shortening our telomeres and shortening our lives. Sleep helps make sure our physical structure has what it needs, and as we saw above we need our physical structures to operate well for us to modulate where our attention goes. 

We need solid, strong, and positive relationships. By cultivating good social relationships we activate our interpersonal dependance system which helps us regulate well, builds our brains, and helps maintain our grounding in present moment situations. It helps us to check-in and check ourselves when one of the above self-regulators is off. 

So today, stop thinking about your emotions as random things that happen to you and take control of this powerful system by feeding yourself well (good self-regulation about all you allow into your system and your environment) and activating the ability to gather the intelligence your emotions give you through your chemical – electrical system. Then use that intelligence to act on those influences doing just what is needed in this moment, based on the moment you are in, not the one you wish you were.

Once you get the information and act upon it, emotions dissipate and you do not have to carry them forward as evidence of past experiences. They are just informational pieces to be used right now, help you survive your experiences, and connect deeply to what is around you. They are not the enemy, they are just information. Use them wisely. 

References:

Bos, P. A., Hofman, D., Hermans, E. J., Montoya, E. R., Baron-Cohen, S., & van Honk, J. (2016). Testosterone reduces functional connectivity during the ‘Reading the mind in the eyes’ test.Psychoneuroendocrinology, 68, 194-201. doi:http://dx.doi.org.tcsedsystem.idm.oclc.org/10.1016/j.psyneuen.2016.03.006

Olsson, A., Kopsida, E., Sorjonen, K., & Savic, I. (2016). Testosterone and estrogen impact social evaluations and vicarious emotions: A double-blind placebo-controlled study.Emotion, 16(4), 515-523. doi:http://dx.doi.org.tcsedsystem.idm.oclc.org/10.1037/a0039765

Rukavina, S., Sachsenweger, F., Jerg-Bretzke, L., Daucher, A., Traue, H., Walter, S., & Hoffmann, H. (2018). Abstract: Testosterone and its influence on emotion recognition in young, healthy males. Psychology,09(07), 1814-1827. doi:10.4236/psych.2018.97106 

Toffoletto, S., Lanzenberger, R., Gingnell, M., Sundström-Poromaa, I., & Comasco, E. (2014). Emotional and cognitive functional imaging of estrogen and progesterone effects in the female human brain: A systematic review. Psychoneuroendocrinology,50, 28-52. doi:10.1016/j.psyneuen.2014.07.025

Graphic Credit: https: Tampa Therapy.//goo.gl/images/fnuwCX 

What is Pain: Emotional? Physical?

The problem with pain – is a big topic in our media right now. There is so much talk about the opioid crisis, questions about what is chronic pain, and wonderings about how we got here. The conversation is large and happening in all sorts of places. In my practice, I deal a lot with pain. I have many clients who struggle with chronic pain, or have been hurt and the acute pain keeps them from activities they love leading to depression or anxiety, or the trauma of the injury disrupts their nervous system, leading to a host of problems. In addition, I see a lot of opiate addiction as a result of prescription medications. Many do not even know how they got to the place of addiction, let alone how to get out of it. I often get questioned about how to deal with pain, especially when opiates are not something available or wanted. This week we’ll be looking closer at pain and what to do about it. 

What is pain anyway?

For most they would answer, this is the signal your body gives when it is hurt or there is something you need to avoid because of potential hurt. However, pain is not always physical and physical problems do not always cause pain (Turk and Winter, 2014). Physical and emotional pain run on the same circuits and whether the pain started as a physical problem (injury/disease) or an emotional problem (depression/grief/anxiety/trauma) the result can feel the same. Physically painful. 

Due to mental health stigma, lack of understanding of the body’s “warning” systems, and heavy marketing of pharmaceuticals many who experience pain sensations turn to drugs. Unfortunately, many of these pills to fix the problem make it worse. Pain medicines often lower your threshold for pain, thus causing a cycle that creates the need for more pain meds. 

Since it feels physical, and our society lacks understanding of how the mind-body connect, we turn to physical solutions. Often at the expense of solving the problem or trying options that may be more powerful. Now, this is not to say medications and physical medicine do not have a place in pain treatment, however many people do not engage in the other half of health – mental health – as part of pain management. Thus, they are left with only half the equation, half the treatment, and often lots of frustration. 

“But it’s so physical you say, it must be a physical problem.”

Maybe. According to Apkarian, Bushness, Treede, and Zubieta, “… emotional state can influence pain perception, and a recent study shows that negative emotional states enhance pain-evoked activity in limbic regions, such as ACC and IC”, (pg. 474, 2005). In a meta analysis on questions related to how humans experience pain, their study looked at areas of the brain responsible for pain sensations. Findings from the many studies in their analysis suggest that pain is felt in different areas of the brain for acute versus chronic pain states and that cognition and emotions influence how, when, and why we experience pain. They also showed evidence for non-medical pain management treatments, such as distraction and acceptance. Yet, for many they never think to turn to or are offered options for non-medical pain management, and end up in the opiate cycle of addictive patterns and need. 

We know our mind and our bodies are connected. Most would say “yes, Stacy you are right”, but not everyone understand’s just how closely connected they are. In my world of somatic psychology we do not even consider them to be separate entities we can speak of. The mind lives in every cell of the body and every biological cell in your body is responding to the environment you are in, including your thoughts and emotions, all the time, every minute of every day. 

When you consider that your physical structure is actually a mental structure with a physical container it becomes easier to see how much your thinking and feeling – which are subjective to the environment around you – play a role in what you feel physically. In my graduate research  I studied how the physical body is influenced by psychological trauma. This trauma could be an event(s) or negative thinking patterns or a chronic sense of overwhelm. All create a similar physical response in the endocrine system that responds as though you were physically hurt or fighting off a disease. The bodymind senses a problem, inflammation rises, and your immune system gets ready to fight. However, in the case of psychological trauma and chronic stress states there may be no tangible predator and your body begins attacking itself. This leads to chronic inflammation – heart problems, cognitive issues, joint pain, digestive issues, chronic pains states like fibromyalgia, and more. The cellular structures sense a problem, however it may not be a physical problem per say, but … it becomes one. The end result is the same … sensations of pain. 

Non-medical pain management treatments.

Many people want to know why pain syndromes are on the rise in our society. This is a complicated issue with many facets, however if we take a global look we can see a number of ideas and areas you may be able to influence your own behavior and help decrease pain in your own life. 

Pay attention to what you allow into your psyche. We “share” pain.

Humans are biologically pack creatures whose brains developed to connect to other mammals. Our brains respond to others in pain. When we are exposed to others in pain, we feel it in our own systems. Even if we do not feel the pain as a physical process, our personal sensitivity to pain is activated (Liu, Meng, Yao, Ye, Fan, and Peng, 2019). By watching that daily news program, listening to stories on the radio of atrocious things happening around the world, and by reading about torturous things we are activating our own pain system and could be elevating our own sensitivity to pain from other sources. 

Food and environmental toxins: another source of inflammation.

In the United States of America our food options can be a source of increasing inflammation in our physical structures. As noted above, when inflammation rises so does our susceptibility to other problems that may seem unrelated but need medical attention. The Standard American Diet (SAD) is very sad, indeed. Most of the foods we are offered are loaded with chemicals, sugar, and salt. On their own these ingredients may not be a big deal but the enormous amount of them in our food, cleaning, and hygiene products is too much for our system. In addition to what we may consume by mouth or through our skin, the mass production of single crops creates a high need for pesticides and chemical trails that get into our water supplies, poison the air we breathe, and lands on our skin through indirect contact. 

Learn to read food and product labelsand remember cheap food is not always good food. Keep in mind that bigger is not always better and more does not always equal care. As many in our culture look to food to fill emotional gaps in our life, find the “sweetness” of life, or “fill up” when we are feeling empty, lacking, alone, bored, or fearful it is important to examine how you use food. The “value” sized cheap chips loaded with “cheese” flavors may be creating an empty feeling you will not be able to fill no matter how much and how often you physically eat. 

If you are confused or feeling overwhelmed by these concepts reach out – there is support and education to help you learn more and work through these issues. 

Another source of stress in our life … ease!

What, you say. How can this be?! Well, the more comfortable we get the harder it is for us to find our own confidence, esteem, worth, and strength. When things are easy we do not have the opportunity to “test” ourselves and learn about our edges. These edges are important for self growth and expansion. Instead, we stay in our comfort zones and let other people’s lives distract us from living our own. 

We stay in the same cultures, doing the same things, and operating on autopilot. This creates boredom and a lack of engagement. Then we look to other things to “fill us up”, see the food paragraph above. We also start to consume media, mood altering substances, tech / internet / using devices, and other items that are not healthy in large quantities. When this overindulgence happens we shift our internal chemistry and we can create situations in which our bodies are overpopulated with bacteria and flora that is not helping us. This imbalance can create a decrease in our body’s ability to create the neurotransmitters, hormones, proteins, and enzymes we need for optimal mental and physical health. 

The more we watch, listen to, and read about tragedies around the world, see images of others in physical and emotional pain, and engage in mindless distraction the more we feel lost. Remember our systems are created to connect, thus our passive engagement with these things creates a physical response in our system, even if indirectly – we are being impacted by everything we consume, in every way we consume it. Guard your consumption well. 

Living in a Fear based culture … real or imagined / accurate or created. It all ends the same in the body – inflammation. 

Lastly let’s talk about stress. In our society we talk a lot about stress, but instead of decreasing it, it often seems like it gets harder to control, even when we know about it. Many of us are not great at setting boundaries and struggle to find the limits to what we want to give, engage in, participate in, and be involved in. We feel pulled to say yes to the groups we are part of (schools, friends, religious, community, kid activities, non-profits). We haven’t learned to say no … or say yes appropriately for our personal system.

Understanding outside influence and group dynamics to set up our fear based culture

Many of us continue to get asked to “do more with less” at work, school, in our household budgets. We are fed lines about what we should want, need, have and do not know what the “spin” is. Some of us are not good at checking the source. We consume media, conversation, social media as though it is true. We figure if the information is coming from a source we like, trust, or feel is “like” us it must be true. We forget that many of these sources are mining our data, targeting us, and working to activate us toward something – usually something that gives that group profits or power. As a result of being overwhelmed we narrow our focal areas and become more rigid and polarized. This is a classic outcome of group dynamics. Social sciences have been studying how groups form, polarize, strengthen, and implode for decades. We have many great examples of group dynamics to study throughout the years. As a result of this polarization and rigidity we become more fearful about “others”. This fear results in a physical change in our bodies. 

Fear is a response we need. It is really helpful when we need a warning system. It is very good when we need to run and get away, however when we are engaged in the activities listed above we can create a sense of fear in the world based on the messages being “spun” to capture our dollars, attention, and engagement. This fear, the kind that is created in the mind based on what we see, read, hear, has the same physical responses in the body as fear based on being chased by a mountain lion. As a result our physical body reacts and feels something that prompts us to move away or fight. This is caused by an increase in adrenaline, norepinephrine, and cortisol. When we are not actually running away, we do not have the opportunity to metabolize the stress chemicals pumping through our system. As a result our system stays “revved up” and inflammation begins to rise. When it is chronic and there is no opportunity to metabolize the hormones, the inflammation states create physical health problems – again, see the above list. The quick result is often a pharmaceutical and all its side effects.

Couple all the above with a lack of exercise and movement, which helps our bodies metabolize out the inflammation states, and you have a recipe for a physical disaster. Add the fuel around mental health stigma, feeling overwhelmed, being too busy, and suddenly it is clear why it is easier to go to a medical doctor and get a pill. Pills are easy and often very effective for the symptom. They just aren’t always the answer for the problem. Often the problem is a behavioral change(s) that will take time to implement and willingness to do the hard work of self examination and radical acceptance. This work does not always result in zero pain, but neither does the quick answer, it just masks it for periods of time. Mental health treatment for pain helps us engage in our life to the best of our abilities and can increase our quality of life even if we continue to experience chronic pain states. 

You get to choose how you will live, what you consume, and what you do with the time you have – Which will you choose? 

Get Moving: The links between physical exercise and psychological states

This week, in the last of the series on self regulation, we are going to talk about exercise and movement. For many exercise is something extra they must do every day, but in reality movement is part of what regulates your body throughout the day. 

It starts with breathing. As you breathe you regulate your sympathetic and para sympathetic parts of your nervous system. You do this through what is known as heart rate variability. Many of us who work in the exercise and health care fields use this number to understand how healthy your cardiovascular system is, however in my world of somatic psychology I can also use it to program movement to help you change your psychological states. This manipulation of your physical system allows for another option to change how you feel without the same level of concentration changing your thoughts may take. 

Mind & Body as One

Lots of people talk about the mind – body connection and how important is is to your health. To me there is no separation. If we want to know if you are stressed we would look at your cortisol levels in your saliva, depressed check out your blood serotonin levels, how well you are absorbing the nutrients you need to make the neurotransmitters to feel content, pleasure, calm, and control your impulses (physical and thought based) we could examine your feces. 

The body and mind do not have a connection point. They are one thing. The mind just has the ability to abstractly consider your experiences and decide what you would like them to mean. This ability gives the impression that the body is separate from the mind, but the mind has nothing to make meaning of if it does not have the body experiences to decipher. Understanding this oneness helps make more sense of our need for movement to regulate our emotions. 

My Research Findings

When I was doing my doctoral research, it was hard to find the bridges to understanding how our physical health intersects our mental health. There were studies with some longevity looking at how aerobic exercise helped depression, anxiety, bi-polar, and even schizophrenia. We could see how exercise impacted stress levels and anecdotally I heard many stories of people who were helped by regular exercise. However, so many people struggle to work out it was hard to understand how psychological struggle was associated with lack of exercise when we know how helpful it is. Turns out there is correlation between how physically stressed your system is and how hard it is for you to exercise. In my research I found that those who struggled with panic disorder (that feeling like you are having a heart attack, going to die, cannot breathe, and are so scared that you cannot think. Sometimes even feel as though you are losing your mind) is the hardest disorder to get enough physical exercise to meet your needs. Problem is, physical exercise is what helps metabolize the chemicals out of your system and decrease your feelings of panic and stress. As the cortisol, adrenaline, and other stress hormones rise in the system, they feed the symptoms creating a self fulfilling cycle of increasing stress levels. Thus making it harder and harder for the person to physically exercise.

Anxiety and Stress

For the person without panic, but with anxiety and stress overload, struggling to exercise is often linked in a similar fashion just not at the same level. It is hard to motivate and get out the door when your physical system is already so tired and feeling overwhelmed. People will describe feeling heavy, lethargic, slow thinking, or in contrast “tired but wired”. As a result exercise seems too hard and it is much easier to grab a substance to unwind or sit and watch TV. 

Depression

Depression is similar but different. In a depressed system every thing feels hard to manage and the body is very fatigued. It is a similar stress on the physical system, but depressed, a different manifestation of difficulties. When feeling depressed we often struggle to see the point of doing anything. People describe feeling heavy, lethargic, overwhelmed, increased sensitivity to pain, and inability to take care of basic living tasks. These make getting on the treadmill pretty darn hard. 

Kbands

How to Help Yourself Start Exercising

One thing interesting from my research was the fact that the more substance use disorder diagnoses someone had the more likely they were to exercise and the less likely they were to buy into barrier beliefs to accomplishing the tasks of working out. What they told me was, they had to move – they’d lost their license and had to ride bikes, walk, and “there isn’t much to do in jail”. As a result they were exposed to movement regularly and therefore saw and felt the benefits and kept the habit going while they could. As a result of their insight it became apparent that exposure was important to helping others begin the process of working out regularly. Enter movement specifically designed to help mental health diagnosed disorders – depression, anxiety, PTSD, phobia, bi-polar, ADHD. I routinely prescribe physical movement along side traditional therapy interventions because the research is pretty clear, exercise helps. It teaches us a lot about ourselves. 

The research links between physical movement and mental health is growing. There is more and more research coming out everyday looking at how the physical system changes as a result of our thinking and how our thinking is changed by our movements. 

So today, just move. Take a moment, get out of your chair or bed and walk around. As you move the body notice what movements might feel good. Based on your current mental state do you want to move slow or fast? Do you want to be close to the ground or jumping? Do you want to be “quiet” in your moments or “loud”? Move slow or explosive?

Use your inner awareness of your current mental health state to determine what movement would be best for you right now … Now go do that.